Article 3 of the Constitution of India

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Article 3 of the Constitution of India

Article 3 of the Constitution of India

Formation of new States and alteration of areas, boundaries or names of existing States.

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NCERT Summary (Class VI – XII) One Liner for UPSC/IAS Preparation

NCERT Summary (Class VI to XII) One Liner for UPSC/IAS Preparation

Parliament may by law-



Provided that no Bill for the purpose shall be introduced in either House of Parliament except on the recommendation of the President and unless, where the proposal contained in the Bill affects the area, boundaries or name of any of the States, the Bill has been referred by the President to the Legislature of that State for expressing its views thereon within such period as may be specified in the reference or within such further period as the President may allow and the period so specified or allowed has expired.


Explanation I.- In this article, in clauses (a) to (e), “State” includes a Union territory, but in the proviso, “State” does not include a Union territory.


Explanation II.- The power conferred on Parliament by clause (a) includes the power to form a new State or Union territory by uniting a part of any State or Union territory to any other State or Union territory.


Explanation of ARTICLE 3 Constitution of India: Formation of new States and alteration of areas, boundaries or names of existing States.

Article 3 of the Indian Constitution empowers the Parliament to form new states, merge existing states, or alter their boundaries or names. This power is crucial for maintaining the country’s territorial integrity and accommodating political and administrative changes.

Procedure for Formation of New States:

Alteration of Boundaries or Names:

Considerations for Decision-Making:

When deciding on these matters, Parliament considers various factors, including:

Impact and Significance:

The power to form and alter states has played a significant role in India’s political landscape. It has enabled the creation of new states based on linguistic, cultural, or regional aspirations. It has also allowed for the adjustment of boundaries to address administrative, economic, or security concerns.

This power has been used to accommodate the diverse needs and aspirations of India’s vast population and has contributed to the country’s federal and democratic structure. It demonstrates the Constitution’s flexibility and adaptability to the ever-changing political and administrative requirements of the nation.

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POLITICAL THEORY NOTES for UPSC/IAS Preparation

POLITICAL THEORY NOTES for UPSC/IAS Preparation